Temagari Nokogiri – Japanese timber saw
Temagari Nokogiri – Japanese timber saw

Temagari Nokogiri – Japanese timber saw

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Only 5 in stock
Available for pickup
In stock at 873 US-1, Woolwich, ME 04579 · Usually ready in 24 hours

In stock at 873 US-1, Woolwich, ME 04579

Temagari Nokogiri – Japanese timber saw · Cross Cut

Available for pickup

873 US-1, Woolwich, ME 04579

Usually ready in 24 hours

873 U.S. 1
Woolwich ME 04579
United States

+12074427938

A large saw for timber framing is hard to find but this one fits the need and is available as a crosscut or a rip saw.

Ripping wood is really difficulty to find and although we love the Ryoba and the Z-Saw, we have been looking for something even bigger!

Kobiki-Nokogiri were used in ancient Japan for the rough ripping of logs into boards for carpenters and cabinetmakers. These saws were used by one man, in contrast to Europe, where typically two men used a ripsaw for similar purposes. To properly guide them in very long cuts, the blades of Kobiki-Nokogiri, also known as Maebiki-Nokogiri, were much wider than those of other saws. The saws were roughly made, and at times still showed the smith’s forge marks. Blades were laboriously hand-tapered from teeth to back to prevent jamming.

Unfortunately, these saws gradually disappeared with the advent of the industrial revolution. However, Temagori-Nokogiri, which are very similar to Kobiki, are more readily available, but are not as wide or as stable. They are used mainly to cut standing timber and thick branches. We got some Temagori Nokogiri - specially produced for us. They are nowadays even uncommon in Japan.

This beautiful Temagari Rip Saw does the trick with 360 mm of progressive teeth will help you tackle even the most formidable ripcuts and the blade can be sharpened! This beautiful saw has a 16" long blade with huge teeth for clearing chips rapidly. The hardwood handle is fitted at an angle of about 30 degrees to the blade, which is ideal for applying  pressure in even, easy pull-strokes.

 

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